Description

Ghee, also known as clarified butter, is a type of highly clarified butter that originated in ancient India. It is commonly used in South Asian and Middle Eastern cuisines and is prized for its rich flavor and high smoke point, making it suitable for frying and sautéing.

Types of Ghee:

  1. Traditional Ghee:

    • Description: Traditional ghee is made by simmering unsalted butter over low heat until the milk solids separate and are removed, leaving behind the golden, clarified butter. It has a rich, nutty flavor and a smooth, creamy texture.
    • Subtypes: N/A
    • Grades: Traditional ghee is graded based on factors such as color, aroma, flavor intensity, and purity. Grades may include Extra Fine, Fine, and Standard.
    • Moisture Content: Traditional ghee typically has a very low moisture content, less than 0.5%.
    • Counts: Sold by weight or quantity per jar, tin, or container.
  2. Organic Ghee:

    • Description: Organic ghee is made from organic, grass-fed cow's milk and is produced without the use of synthetic pesticides, hormones, or antibiotics. It has a similar flavor and texture to traditional ghee but is considered to be of higher quality and purity.
    • Subtypes: N/A
    • Grades: Organic ghee is graded based on factors such as organic certification, purity, and adherence to organic farming standards. Grades may include Extra Fine, Fine, and Standard.
    • Moisture Content: Organic ghee typically has a very low moisture content, less than 0.5%.
    • Counts: Sold by weight or quantity per jar, tin, or container.

Additional Information:

  • Nutritional Value: Ghee is rich in fat-soluble vitamins such as vitamin A, D, E, and K, as well as essential fatty acids. It is also lactose-free and may be suitable for individuals with lactose intolerance.
  • Storage: Ghee should be stored in a cool, dry place away from sunlight to prevent oxidation and rancidity. It does not require refrigeration and has a long shelf life.
  • Uses: Ghee is used in cooking and baking, as well as in traditional medicine and religious rituals. It is often used to sauté vegetables, fry spices, and add richness to dishes such as rice, lentils, and desserts.