Description

Sesame seeds are oil-rich seeds derived from the Sesamum indicum plant. They are widely used in culinary applications and prized for their nutty flavor and nutritional benefits. Both black sesame and white sesame seeds come from the same plant but differ in color and subtle flavor variations.

Types of Sesame Seeds:

  1. White Sesame Seeds (Sesamum indicum):

    • Description: White sesame seeds are small, oval-shaped seeds with a light golden to off-white color. They have a mild, nutty flavor and are commonly used in various cuisines around the world.
    • Subtypes: N/A
    • Grades: White sesame seeds are graded based on factors such as size, color, cleanliness, and absence of foreign matter. Grades may include Extra Fancy, Fancy, and Standard.
    • Moisture Content: White sesame seeds typically have a moisture content of around 5-7%.
    • Counts: Sold by weight or quantity per bag or package (e.g., 1kg bag, 5lb package).
  2. Black Sesame Seeds (Sesamum indicum):

    • Description: Black sesame seeds are slightly smaller than white sesame seeds and have a dark black or deep purple color. They have a rich, earthy flavor with subtle bitter notes.
    • Subtypes: N/A
    • Grades: Similar grading criteria as white sesame seeds, focusing on size, color, cleanliness, and absence of foreign matter.
    • Moisture Content: Black sesame seeds typically have a moisture content of around 5-7%.
    • Counts: Sold by weight or quantity per bag or package.

Additional Information:

  • Nutritional Value: Both black and white sesame seeds are rich in healthy fats, protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals such as calcium, iron, and magnesium. They are also a good source of antioxidants.
  • Storage: Sesame seeds should be stored in a cool, dry place in an airtight container to prevent rancidity and prolong shelf life. Properly stored, they can last for several months to a year.
  • Uses: Sesame seeds are used in a wide range of culinary dishes, including baked goods, salads, stir-fries, sauces, and dressings. They can be sprinkled on top of dishes for added texture and flavor or ground into tahini paste for dips and spreads.